Creativity amidst destruction

To employ a spice is to ignore nature’s admonishments. We humans intentionally gather plants with high concentrations of defensive chemicals or warning aromas and add them to our food, typically in small doses. The Chemicals associated with the bitter tastes of dandelions and dill, for example, are poisons. The fragrant aromas of garlic, mint, thyme, and dill are warnings of the existence of poisons. They say, without any real ambiguity, “Go away you beast with terrible gnashing teeth and bad breath or I will make you suffer.” Eating such plants despite their warnings is a bold act. Yet, it is one to which we have grown numb. We are so accustomed to the flavors and aromas of spices that we don’t consider the unusualness of consuming them. With spices, then, we need to explain two things. We need to explain how it is that we humans readily convince ourselves that spices are pleasing. Then we need to make sense of why we began to do so, why we began to spice foods and to enjoy spiced foods.

From Chapter VI: On the origin of spices / page 134 — in “Delicious — The evolution of flavor and how it made us human”, a book by Rob Dunn and Monica Sanchez.

We may admit being small creatures in a vast universe, while playing on our individual and collective greatness. But most living beings operate in the believe that life will not avoid death.

Wether by writing poetry, or composing music that may move souls beyond my blood lineage, wether I think beyond what my contemporaries can even grasp today, how do I embrace this energetic living spirit within me? Shall I gently accept life as an invitation to avoid death, or shall I challenge death?

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