The Life You Give: Angela Gheorghiu *IX 7 1965

Angela Gheorghiu, born Angela Burlacu on September 7, 1965, in Adjud, Romania, is an operatic lyric soprano noted for her powerful voice and commanding stage presence.

Gheorghiu early realized her love of singing, and she was supported by her family in working toward a career in opera. She left home at age 14 to study at the Academy of Music in Bucharest and in 1990 made her debut as Mimi in Giacomo Puccini’s La Bohème at the Cluj-Napoca National Romanian Opera. Her international debut came in 1992 as Zerlina in Mozart’s Don Giovanni at the Royal Opera, Covent Garden, in London. Two years later Gheorghiu, an elegant and compelling artist, was praised as one of the great Violettas when she performed the role in Sir Georg Solti’s production of Giuseppe Verdi’s La traviata at Covent Garden. Her performance (1993) in La Bohème for New York City’s Metropolitan Opera, a production that marked her U.S. debut, was highly praised by critics. She did not work with a teacher, subscribing to a philosophy of self-reliance, and was sometimes compared to the great coloratura soprano Maria Callas.


Opera, Blood, and Tears
presents
The Life You Give: Angela Gheorghiu
celebrating her life in music
September 7 at 1pm EST
on Clubhouse


Gheorghiu met French-born tenor Roberto Alagna in 1992 while appearing with him in La Bohème at Covent Garden. Their relationship deepened during her stint in Solti’s production of La traviata, and they married in 1996 following a very public romance. After their marriage, Gheorghiu and Alagna sought joint bookings with recording studios and opera houses throughout the world. Though Gheorghiu’s penchant for speaking her mind was much remarked upon, she continued to be in demand as a performer.

Gheorghiu recorded numerous albums, including live performances of her roles and solo concerts, such as Puccini’s Il trittico (1999) and La rondine (2003) and Live from La Scala (2007). With compilations such as Arias (1996) and Diva (2004), she showcased her vocal range and versatility by singing selections from across the operatic canon. Her duet albums with Alagna, such as Duets and Arias (1996), also were popular. Gheorghiu filmed several performances, among them her turn as Violetta in Solti’s production of La traviata and her interpretation of Verdi’s Requiem Mass (2001). Films that achieved cinematic release, such as Tosca (2001), in which she took the title role, further widened her audience.

By Amanda E. Fuller / Source: Britannica


“La Traviata” by Giuseppe Verdi

Synopsis

ACT I

Violetta Valéry knows that she will die soon, exhausted by her restless life as a courtesan. At a party she is introduced to Alfredo Germont, who has been fascinated by her for a long time. Rumor has it that he has been enquiring after her health every day. The guests are amused by this seemingly naïve and emotional attitude, and they ask Alfredo to propose a toast. He celebrates true love, and Violetta responds in praise of free love (Ensemble: “Libiamo ne’ lieti calici”). She is touched by his candid manner and honesty. Suddenly she feels faint, and the guests withdraw. Only Alfredo remains behind and declares his love (Duet: “Un dì felice”). There is no place for such feelings in her life, Violetta replies. But she gives him a camellia, asking him to return when the flower has faded. He realizes this means he will see her again the following day. Alone, Violetta is torn by conflicting emotions—she doesn’t want to give up her way of life, but at the same time she feels that Alfredo has awakened her desire to be truly loved (“Ah, fors’è lui… Sempre libera”).

ACT II

Violetta has chosen a life with Alfredo, and they enjoy their love in the country, far from society (“De’ miei bollenti spiriti”). When Alfredo discovers that this is only possible because Violetta has been selling her property, he immediately leaves for Paris to procure money. Violetta has received an invitation to a masked ball, but she no longer cares for such distractions. In Alfredo’s absence, his father, Giorgio Germont, pays her a visit. He demands that she separate from his son, as their relationship threatens his daughter’s impending marriage (Duet: “Pura siccome un angelo”). But over the course of their conversation, Germont comes to realize that Violetta is not after his son’s money—she is a woman who loves unselfishly. He appeals to Violetta’s generosity of spirit and explains that, from a bourgeois point of view, her liaison with Alfredo has no future. Violetta’s resistance dwindles and she finally agrees to leave Alfredo forever. Only after her death shall he learn the truth about why she returned to her old life. She accepts the invitation to the ball and writes a goodbye letter to her lover. Alfredo returns, and while he is reading the letter, his father appears to console him (“Di Provenza”). But all the memories of home and a happy family can’t prevent the furious and jealous Alfredo from seeking revenge for Violetta’s apparent betrayal.
At the masked ball, news has spread of Violetta and Alfredo’s separation. There are grotesque dance entertainments, ridiculing the duped lover. Meanwhile, Violetta and her new lover, Baron Douphol, have arrived. Alfredo and the baron battle at the gaming table and Alfredo wins a fortune: lucky at cards, unlucky in love. When everybody has withdrawn, Alfredo confronts Violetta, who claims to be truly in love with the Baron. In his rage Alfredo calls the guests as witnesses and declares that he doesn’t owe Violetta anything. He throws his winnings at her. Giorgio Germont, who has witnessed the scene, rebukes his son for his behavior. The baron challenges his rival to a duel.

ACT III

Violetta is dying. Her last remaining friend, Doctor Grenvil, knows that she has only a few more hours to live. Alfredo’s father has written to Violetta, informing her that his son was not injured in the duel. Full of remorse, he has told him about Violetta’s sacrifice. Alfredo wants to rejoin her as soon as possible. Violetta is afraid that he might be too late (“Addio, del passato”). The sound of rampant celebrations are heard from outside while Violetta is in mortal agony. But Alfredo does arrive and the reunion fills Violetta with a final euphoria (Duet: “Parigi, o cara”). Her energy and exuberant joy of life return. All sorrow and suffering seems to have left her—a final illusion, before death claims her.

Source: Metropolitan Opera

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