The Life You Give: Claudio Arrau *1903

Claudio Arrau, born February 6 1903, in Chillán, Chile, was one of the most-renowned pianists of the 20th century.

Arrau’s father, an eye doctor, died when Arrau—the youngest of three children—was one year old. His mother supported the family by giving piano lessons and must have been gratified when her own son proved to be a child prodigy at the piano. Claudio studied privately in Santiago for two years and then traveled at the expense of the Chilean government to Berlin, where he studied from 1912 to 1918 with Martin Krause, once a student of Franz Liszt. Arrau’s serious career began with a recital in Berlin in 1914, and during the next decade he toured extensively in Europe, South America, and the United States. Between 1924 and 1940 he taught at Julius Stern’s Conservatory in Berlin, and in 1941 he moved permanently to the United States, becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen only in 1979, after the rise of Augusto Pinochet in Chile. Arrau continued his frequent touring past his 80th birthday.


The Aristipposian Poet
presents
The Life You Give: Claudio Arrau
in celebration of his life in music
February 6 at 9:30pm EST
on Clubhouse


Arrau focused his considerable powers on the music of Liszt, Johannes Brahms, Frédéric Chopin, Robert Schumann, Claude Debussy, and, above all, Ludwig van Beethoven. In 1935 he played all the keyboard works of J.S. Bach in a series of 12 concerts. His performances of the complete piano sonatas of Beethoven (there are 32) were broadcast by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).

Arrau’s awards are too numerous to mention, and his library of recorded works is enormous. Regarded as one of the least ostentatious of the century’s virtuoso pianists, he developed a classical approach that exhibited an extreme concentration on detail without sacrificing feeling.

Source: Britannica

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